Tag Archives: mental disorders

Speaking engagements

Here are some of my recent and upcoming speaking engagements:

20th October 2018 – Royal Marine Hotel, Dun Laoghaire, Dublin. Irish Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (IACP) Annual Conference. Conference theme: “Into the Future”.

28th to 30th June 2018 – Bogota, Columbia. William Glasser International Conference. Talk title: To be confirmed. Click here for conference information.

27th and 28th October 2017Bled, Slovenia. European Institute for Reality Therapy Conference, “The Days of Leon Lojk”. Talk titles:- Day 1: “Towards Real Truth and Progress in Global Mental Health”, Day 2: “Working Therapeutically with Clients with a Psychiatric Diagnosis”. Click here for conference information.

07th October 2017 – Kilkenny, IrelandAnnual Education Day for general practitioners.

28th September 2017 – Limerick, Ireland. Psychotherapist Training Day, Henry Street Social Services Centre, Limerick.

19th July 2017 – radio interview. The Peter Breggin Hour. My third appearance on American psychiatrist Peter Breggin’s radio show. Click here to listen to our conversation.

14th October 2016 – Aviva Stadium, Dublin. Mental Health and Wellbeing Summit. Talk title:- “Towards a New Era in Mental Health”.

06th October 2016 – Cork Institute of Technology. Department of Social Care. Talk title:-  “Towards a New Era in Mental Health”.

08th April 2016 – Limerick Institute of Technology.  Keynote speaker, 3rd Annual Undergraduate Conference and Social Science Fair. Link to LIT News report.

 

 

 

Dr. Terry Lynch speaking at the The Health Zone, Limerick, September 2016.

The Health Zone is a positive health initiative originating from University College, Cork, Ireland. In September 2016, The Health Zone held its first meeting in Limerick, at which I was an invited speaker.

“Towards emotional and psychological maturity” was the theme of the evening. I build my talk around that theme, and around a related and important issue, the need for a new era in mental health.

Ten facts about depression. Some may surprise you.

Depression is, we are told, one of the commonest medical illnesses globally.

As a medical doctor with over thirty years experience, I am aware that much myth, mystery and misinformation surrounds what we have come to call “depression”.

In the pdf that accompanies this blog, I set out ten facts about depression. Many – perhaps most – of these facts are not commonly understood as facts in relation to depression. This is primarily due to the fact that misinformation has regrettably been regularly churned out regarding depression for over 40 years, a pattern that needs to stop.

By becoming aware of the real facts in relation to depression, you will (a) empower yourself regarding your own understanding, and (b) help towards changing the weight of information regarding depression towards truth, simply be becoming aware of these truth and, if and when feels appropriate, discussing these truths and facts with others.

To access these ten facts about depression, simply sign up to my mental health newsletter (you can unsubscribe any time you wish) through the form below, and you will have immediate access to the “ten facts” pdf.

It’s official: Psychiatric diagnoses are NOT known brain disorders

According to the prevailing global view of mental health, psychiatric diagnoses – depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), eating disorders, personality disorders etc – are fundamentally brain disorders.

In  a ten-minute video, I address this belief. The truth may surprise you.

Access the video by signing up to my newsletter updates (you can unsubscribe at any time)through the form below.

 

Confused public perception of medical mental health doctors, including psychiatrists

The public have a skewed perception of the medical doctors who are generally seen as expert in mental health – psychiatrists and GPs, or family physicians. While there are some exceptions, in general, the perception that most people have of medical doctors as THE foremost experts in mental health is, regrettably, incorrect.

This is one of the many mental health topics I discuss in my blog, books and courses. If you would like to receive my posts, subscribe to my newsletter through the form at the end of this blog (you can unsubscribe at any time), and immediately receive a short video in which I discuss this surprising reality.

Best wishes,

Terry.

Drug companies abandon psychiatry

Did you know that many major drug companies have either ceased their involvement in psychiatric research altogether or considerably reduced their involvement?

This is not a development that reflects well on psychiatry, which is why it has received so little publicity.

But it is a profoundly significant development, for a number of reasons. Not many years ago, psychiatry and the pharmaceutical industry were cosy bedfellows, “partners”.

Not any more.

I wrote about this development, why it has happened, and its major significance, in my 2015 book Depression Delusion: The Myth of the Brain Chemical Imbalance, foreword by Robert Whitaker.

To receive a free extract about this major development, subscribe to my newsletter updates through the form at the end of this blog. You can unsubscribe any time you like.

Best wishes,

Terry.

Dr. Terry Lynch.

Physician; psychotherapist; best-selling mental health author; provider of recovery-oriented mental health service; member of Expert Group on Mental Health Policy (2003-6) that formulated A Vision for Change, Ireland’s official mental health policy document.

 

Psychiatry’s precarious position – between a rock and a hard place

What exactly is psychiatry’s place in the world of mental health? 

Proponents of mainstream psychiatry – including the majority of psychiatrists and GPs – have for over 50 years persuaded both themselves and the majority of the general public that psychiatry’s place at the pinnacle of the mental health pyramid is entirely justified.

 But, is psychiatry’s “expert” position in mental health really justified?       

Actually, if the truth be told, psychiatry occupies a very precarious position, sitting somewhere between neurology and neurosurgery on one side, the medical specialities that treat known brain disorders, and the various so-called “talking therapies” on the other side. Maintaining this position into the future greatly depends upon the general public continuing to be misled regarding psychiatry’s actual position and place in mental health.

Between a rock and a hard place: psychiatry’s actual position in mental health

If you would like to understand psychiatry’s actual position, and the great deception of the general public that has been going for decades regarding psychiatry’s position, download a FREE extract from my 2015 book, Depression Delusion: the Myth of the Brain Chemical Imbalance –  foreword by Robert Whitaker, described as “truly remarkable” by psychologist Dr. Phil Hickey in his review of this book on the Mad in America website in 2015 – simply by subscribing to my newsletter updates at the end of this blog (from which you can unsubscribe at any time).

Best wishes,

Terry.

Dr. Terry Lynch,

physician, psychotherapist, author, recovery-oriented mental health provider

https://doctorterrylynch.com/                                                                        info@doctorterrylynch.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coming soon: Online Mental Health Academy. First course: “Depression training for people who work in mental health”

After much thought, I have decided to create a series of courses in mental health.

In essence, my partner psychotherapist Marianne Murphy and I are creating a mental health school, a Mental Health Academy. Marianne and I will work together to create and deliver these courses.

This Academy will be designed for online participation. Our courses will be available online. We will also be running courses at various venues.

These courses will cover a wide range of topics. In these courses we will set out a comprehensive understanding of psychiatric diagnoses like depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, OCD, eating disorders and personality disorders. We will also address anxiety, suicide, self-esteem and many other emotional and mental health issues.

These courses will address a glaring gap in understanding of and training in mental health – the gap in understanding of the emotional and psychological aspects of mental health, including the range psychiatric diagnoses.

A clear understanding of the medical approach to these diagnoses will also be a core part of these courses.

These course will reflect what I have learned through 30 years of involvement in mental health.

I have reflected upon I have learned during 30 years as a medical doctor; 15 years as a psychotherapist; 9 years on Irish Government-appointed high-level mental health groups,
including 3 years (2003-6) on the Expert Group on Mental Health Policy which formulated “A Vision for Change”, Ireland’s official mental health policy document; 25 years researching emotional and mental health, including psychiatric diagnoses; 15 years providing a recovery-oriented mental health service; 3 decades of seeking to deepen my understanding of emotional and mental health; 3 books on mental health including 1 best-seller, many more to come; 3 decades of working with people in great distress and learning from every one; twenty years of connection with some of the most inspiring people in mental health globally; and  what I have experienced and learned in my own journey through the twists and turns of my life.

And from this breadth of knowledge and experience, these courses will be created.

Our courses will be specially constructed for different audiences including therapists and other mental health professionals, people who have received a psychiatric diagnosis, and other interested people including family members and others who for their own reasons wish to increase their understanding of emotional and mental health and psychiatric diagnoses.

We are currently working on our first course, working title “Depression training for people who work in mental health”.

This course will help those who work in either a professional or voluntary capacity (including trainees) with people diagnosed with depression to understand depression more deeply and to respond more effectively and with greater confidence.

I expect this course to be available in about 3 months or less. Further courses will be created on an ongoing basis.

Marianne and I are very excited about this new development. I envisage the development and delivery of these courses becoming a core part of my work into the future.

We will update people on the progress of these courses through our newsletter. If you have not already done so, I invite you to subscribe to our newsletter at https://doctorterrylynch.com/

When you subscribe to our newsletter, you will also receive two free chapters of my books:

One chapter from Selfhood: A Key to the Recovery of Emotional Wellbeing, Mental Health and the Prevention of Mental Health Problems, 2011, chapter title: “Boundaries and personal space”.

One chapter from my latest book Depression Delusion Volume One: The Myth of the Brain Chemical Imbalance, 2015, chapter title: “The medical profession and the brain”.

Our intention is to create comprehensive courses in which the needs of participants will be addressed.

If you have ideas regarding what you would like these courses to cover, please feel free to contact me and let me know, at info@doctorterrylynch.com .

While we will endeavour to cover all bases, we would love to hear your ideas, just to ensure we don’t leave out any important material.

Please share this information with anyone you think would like to know about it.

Best wishes,

Terry.

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Mental health features prominently in Cork Film Festival (6th-15th Nov 2015)

Hats off the the Cork Film Festival

In its 60th year, the Cork Film Festival runs from Nov 6th to Nov 15th.

The organisers have not forgotten mental health. In fact, the festival explicitly recognises the importance of mental health under the category “Illuminate”, which also features as a main tab on the festival’s website.

Three films feature in the Illuminate section of the Cork Film Festival this year. Emotional and mental issues and the dilemmas and challenges involved feature as important themes in each film. These will be screened towards the end of the festival, on the 12th, 13th, 14th Nov.

Each screening will be followed by a discussion involving a panel and the audience on mental health including aspects that surfaced within the film. I will be on the panel for the 3rd film, (“Hedi Schneider is Stuck”, Triskel Arts Centre, Tobin St., Cork, 1.30 pm, Saturday). I understand that West Cork psychiatrist Pat Bracken is on the panel for one of the Illuminate films. Full details of the Illuminate screenings at  http://www.corkfilmfest.org/illuminate/   Full festival catalogue at http://www.corkfilmfest.org/2015/

Great to see mental health respected and involved in this manner at the Cork Film Festival. I would encourage people to vote with their feet and support such initiatives.

The more such initiatives are actively supported, the stronger the winds of progress and change in mental health become.

 

 

 

 

 

US psychologist Dr. Paula Caplan PhD’s praise for my 2015 book “Depression Delusion Volume One: The Myth of the Brain Chemical imbalance”

Dr. Paula Caplan Ph. D. is an American clinical and research psychologist and social justice and human rights activist. I first came across Paula and her work about 20 years ago. At that time, I was rapidly losing faith in my medical training in mental health. I was becoming increasingly disillusioned with the medical approach to human distress, including the whole medical approach to psychiatric diagnosis, which made progressively less sense to me the more I critiqued it. Back then, I was grateful to find principled mental health professionals like Paula Caplan and Peter Breggin.

Paula Caplan’s CV is impressive.  She was previously professor of psychology, assistant professor of psychiatry and head of the Center for Women’s Studies at the University of Toronto. She has received much recognition for her work including an Eminent Woman Psychologist award in 1996 from the American Psychological Association, a 1995-96 Presidential Citation for Contributions as Chair of Sexism in Diagnosis Task Force, and a Distinguished Career Award in 2008 from the Association for Women in Psychology.

Paula Caplan was a consultant to two committees appointed by the DSM-4 Task Force’s lead psychiatrist Allen Frances to adjudicate on what should be included in the DSM-4 which was published in 1994. As she subsequently explained, Paula Caplan resigned from these committees on principle:

“I resigned from those committees after two years because I was appalled by the way I saw that good scientific research was often being ignored, distorted, or lied about and the way that junk science was being used as though it were of high quality . . . if that suited the aims of those in charge. I also resigned because I was increasingly learning that giving someone a psychiatric label was extremely unlikely to reduce their suffering but carried serious risks of harm, and when I had reported these concerns and examples of harm to those at the top, they had ignored or even publicly misrepresented the facts. I wrote about what I learned from my insider’s position in my book, They Say You’re Crazy: How the World’s Most Powerful Psychiatrists Decide Who’s Normal (Caplan, 1995).” http://freakoutcrazy.com/category/paula-caplan/ 

I have not yet have the pleasure of meeting Paula, though I’m sure that our paths will cross, given our shared passion for truth in mental health. We have been in regular contact over the years.

I am delighted that Paula felt it appropriate to write the following about my new book Depression Delusion Volume One: The Myth of the Brain Chemical Imbalance on the Stop Psychiatric Diagnosis Harm Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/groups/PLAN.T.Alliance/  (posted 24th October 2015):

“I just finished reading Dr. Terry Lynch’s phenomenal, compelling, scrupulously argued book, Depression Delusion. It is clearly written and hard to put down. It is encyclopedic in that he seems to have read every claim ever made about depression being due to a chemical imbalance in the brain, and he does all the work for us — citing each of these appalling quotations and then walking us step by step through their failures of logic and the stunning lack of evidence behind them. This book is not to be missed! If your library doesn’t have it, urge them to order it right away, and make sure you are first on the list to get it.”

For more information on my books, visit my website https://doctorterrylynch.com/ , where you can download two free chapters, one from each of my most recent books, Depression Delusion and Selfhood.